Correcting Bad Release Habits(?)

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TomaHawk
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Correcting Bad Release Habits(?)

Post by TomaHawk »

Over the years, I've had several bowlers that were very good athletes. All had above average fast twitch muscles. They all had a couple things in common too, turning the ball early and turning it violently. Try as they might, they just could not stop releasing the ball so violently.

In an effort to keep them from over working the ball, I drilled a little different pitches in the ball. Pitches that, should they turn the ball early or hit the ball, they would feel it all the way to their feet. But, when they released the ball properly, they felt nothing and developed devastating strike power.

Today, they are all very accomplished bowlers. I have to admit, it was a pretty mean lesson.

All of them are now utilizing reasonable drilling techniques in terms of span and pitches.

Here is the question, has anyone else gone to such extreme measures to obtain the desired results?
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Re: Correcting Bad Release Habits(?)

Post by MegaMav »

The foul line drill works for my students to keep things relaxed at the line.
TomaHawk
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Re: Correcting Bad Release Habits(?)

Post by TomaHawk »

The foul line drill is very effective, used it extensively while coaching at the collegiate and high school levels. It was somewhat frustrating to see a few people not benefit from the exercise. This particular group of people would constantly accelerate the swing too early even while doing the foul drill.

That is when I began thinking about the psychological and physiological make-up of the individual. If a person has already experienced success in some other sporting endeavors, they tend to approach bowling as a much more physical / violent movement rather than absolute flow and balance.

Here is what makes bowling so difficult, the perimeters. We are throwing a heavy object at a target that is 60 feet away. Not only that, there are 10 of them. That, in and of itself, sends a signal to the brain whereby it would appear a lot of effort will be required. Better athletes look at it as if it's a physical challenge. It is instinctive. Changing those natural responses is sometimes difficult.

So, for lack of a better description, I put an electric collar around their neck.

Now that I think about it...
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kajmk
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Re: Correcting Bad Release Habits(?)

Post by kajmk »

"Here is what makes bowling so difficult, the perimeters. We are throwing a heavy object at a target that is 60 feet away. Not only that, there are 10 of them. That, in and of itself, sends a signal to the brain whereby it would appear a lot of effort will be required. Better athletes look at it as if it's a physical challenge. It is instinctive. Changing those natural responses is sometimes difficult."

Edit - MegaMavs suggestion of foul line drill is easy to do and a proven method.
It can also be done at home kneeling down rolling towards a couch with pillows to protect the couch.

Next Ritgers kneel down drill , rolling to a partner at lanes on approach or at home.

The original text follows.
Parts of which resemble a Rube Goldberg cartoon ... Sunday funny pages used to have a Rube Goldberg cartoon.

The device below was probably contrived when Covid curtailed folks from going out!





A few thoughts and ramblings ...

An device can be constructed using plastic pvc piping.
This will resemble a football goal post .
The device will straddle the lane. A curtain can be hung on the cross bar to hide the pins.
An add on could be a light chain to dangle from the cross bar, the object is to hit the dangle.

There have been commercial devices such as what I tried to describe.

Shadow bowling ( no pins ) pretty much does not exist. Earl Anthony wrote that when he worked at a bowling center, he did about 300 shadow games a week. I read his book many moons ago.

Eventually emphasize targeting points on the lane. Initially the dots and arrows. Graduate to a near target e.g. arrow zone to a spot down the lane (this will ultimately be the breakpoint area,), later introduce the concept of focal points at the pin deck.

Use of the thumb makes the action of releasing psychologically and physically challenging.
We want to hold on to the ball and do something to it.

Dick Ritgers on approach kneel down drill where the bowler rolls the ball to the coach positioned by the foul line can help train the hand.

Think soft ...
Del Ballard broke his arm as a boy when he fell from his bike.
He initially was a grip and rip kid.
Once his arm was out of the cast, he started rolling golf balls into a small hole he cut in a shoe box.
He was afraid to injure his arm and developed his soft style. Read that many years ago.

Another thought, have your student roll his ball to the 6 or 4 pin, this takes scoring out of the psychological mix. All we want to do is roll it to a zone ...

Hope something above helps ...

Tossing a softball to a partner can help.

Tug McGraw said "Ya gotta believe".
May all beings everywhere be happy and free,
and may the thoughts, words, and actions of my own life
contribute in some way to that happiness
and to that freedom for all.

John
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