Observation without judgement

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kajmk
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Observation without judgement

Post by kajmk » October 24th, 2019, 4:32 pm

[youtube][/youtube]


There are quite a few videos on the topic.
A Google search brings up pages ...

Worth a look.


I wonder what goes through a babies mind as they learn to walk ...
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so

There should be a rule of war saying you have to see someone up close and get to know 'em before it's ok to shoot 'em

Empathize

John

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Re: Observation without judgement

Post by TomaHawk » November 1st, 2019, 12:34 am

I believe they are referring to the inner mind. There is a calm, peaceful place that really great athletes live in when they are competing, it is void of conscientious thoughts. It does not take place without a tremendous amount of physical training though.

Physical training, working on various parts of a complete movement step by step can become somewhat tiresome, even boring. As a result, only a select few can endure the challenge mentally. The greatest athletes seem to have an extreme amount of patience. It is difficult to stay on a path when there is seemingly no progress in sight.

Great athletes practice the most mundane elements of the movement correctly, efficiently, over, and over, and over again. They also have the capacity to resist the urge to move on to another part of the movement without perfecting the first. That is called perfect practice. I like to refer to it as patient practice.

Look at an athlete like Tom Brady. He stills practices as if he has just learned to throw a football. The end result speaks for itself. It's inconceivable that he is thinking about his arm or shoulder angles when a 350lb. defensive lineman is bearing down on him. It's all a well practiced movement.

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kajmk
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Re: Observation without judgement

Post by kajmk » November 1st, 2019, 3:08 pm

TomaHawk wrote:I believe they are referring to the inner mind. There is a calm, peaceful place that really great athletes live in when they are competing, it is void of conscientious thoughts. It does not take place without a tremendous amount of physical training though.

Physical training, working on various parts of a complete movement step by step can become somewhat tiresome, even boring. As a result, only a select few can endure the challenge mentally. The greatest athletes seem to have an extreme amount of patience. It is difficult to stay on a path when there is seemingly no progress in sight.

Great athletes practice the most mundane elements of the movement correctly, efficiently, over, and over, and over again. They also have the capacity to resist the urge to move on to another part of the movement without perfecting the first. That is called perfect practice. I like to refer to it as patient practice.

Look at an athlete like Tom Brady. He stills practices as if he has just learned to throw a football. The end result speaks for itself. It's inconceivable that he is thinking about his arm or shoulder angles when a 350lb. defensive lineman is bearing down on him. It's all a well practiced movement.

Wisdom!


From Oct Bowler's Journal. 5 Key Lessons I Learned Before Turning Professional
Sydney Brummett on her biggest takeaways from years steeped in information about life both on and off the lanes.


"Greatness Is Built While No One Is Watching" Sydney Brummett.
It ain't what you don't know that gets you into trouble. It's what you know for sure that just ain't so

There should be a rule of war saying you have to see someone up close and get to know 'em before it's ok to shoot 'em

Empathize

John

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