Coaching 2 handers

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JJakobsen
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Coaching 2 handers

Post by JJakobsen » September 26th, 2021, 10:00 pm

Hi! ETBF doesn't have anything concrete on 2-handed bowling. I am currently waiting on the national coaching team to get back to me on this, but until then:

Steps and timing, what do I do with my juniors? A qualified guess would be that the 3 channel concept would stay to keep the body away from the ball when its passing the thigh like on one handers, get body angles set up and keeping the ball going in the direction you want to throw it. Of course, the step lengths would obviously differ due to their shuffle/jump step before sliding and releasing.

Also, body angles are more extreme than one-handed players, anything I should look out for? I got one that is bending at his back, I need to correct this so he gets more of that bend in his waist, but I'm not entirely sure how to correct it.

I will follow the national coaching teams drills and recommendations when I get them, they will probably be very similar to what you guys say anyways. I'm supposed to get videos and instructions for different drills, but things do take time, they just arranged the national championship here, so they were probably busy there, while my juniors are very busy playing at the bowling center! :D
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deanchamp
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Re: Coaching 2 handers

Post by deanchamp » September 27th, 2021, 4:05 am

Hi, there are lots of variables with 2-handers and they are all a bit different.

Below are some of my coaching notes for 2-handers:

There are generally two types of swings, Type 'P' and Type 'O'.

Type ‘P’ = Perpendicular
Perpendicular to the line of movement. 90 degrees.
Hips are responsible for direction of delivery.
Upper body side tilt needed today.
Shoulders rotate up and down (not side to side). Need upper body side tilt to do this.
Hips forward – left shoulder drops, right shoulder goes back.

The ‘P’ elements: Centre of the hand
Eyes
Elbow
are all over and on the target line

Type ‘O’ = Open
Ball in front of the body, walk around the ball with open hips.
Belmo – no hand cock. Hand under the ball.
Belmo – ball loops out to the right as he walks around it and then aligns and drops the ball inside on the downswing.

Type ‘O’ Elements: Both arms form a circle
Eyes are placed on top of the circle
The line of play passes through the centre of the hand
Hips are open to the line of play

2-Handers Timing
Both styles – get off your back leg onto your front leg. Step, skip, step.
Bowling is a game of motion and fluidity – not position
Speed of the swing, length of the approach
Ball into the swing early, footwork quick to accelerate passed the ball.
Prior to the release - ball behind the hips
- head outside the ball, lateral spine tilt
The timing system needs to be delayed from the leverage point. This is at or behind the CG of the body.
Early timing at the release promotes some issues.

2-Handed Elements
The arms must form a circle to the line of play, working ‘up and down’.
Bowling shoulder moves up and down the line of play.
Get the ball down into the lane. No ‘up’ in bowling, unload downwards, use gravity.
Bowling hand inside the shoulder and underneath the face at the release. Ball position outside the shoulder causes a few issues.
- To be quick in any sport, you need to be relaxed.
Loose and relaxed for a quick movement. The ‘wet dog’ drill – shake your body with loose limbs.
The start of the unloading of the release earlier as it takes longer.
Bowling hand to be straight or slightly open at the bottom of the swing.
- Hand not outside with the fingers inside, and no wrist cock.
- Closed and cocked hand promotes issues and injuries.
Body and swing alignment help to maximise speed and the release.
Need more spine angle as less backswing – need more waist bend.
WRW and Earl Anthony – trail leg off the approach as full weight transfer forward.
Last edited by deanchamp on September 30th, 2021, 1:24 am, edited 1 time in total.
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JJakobsen
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Re: Coaching 2 handers

Post by JJakobsen » September 28th, 2021, 8:51 am

deanchamp wrote:
September 27th, 2021, 4:05 am
*Text*
Perpendicular, do you have any examples of bowlers here? The other type seems to be the norm on the pro tour, at least those who make it to the bright lights.

Any thoughts on step lengths? For one handers I have in my notes normal, normal, long, short, longest (slide). Timing is ofc nothing, ball forward and drop, ball passes thigh as legs pass eachother towards step 3, and a couple more timing points along the way.
Anything similar I can use to analyze? I'm a big fan of using high FPS slowmo to check this stuff, same goes for release. I have a feeling you don't mind this either!😁
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Re: Coaching 2 handers

Post by deanchamp » September 30th, 2021, 1:22 am

Kyle Troup are Chris Via are 'P' types.

As for step lengths, due to the shorter back swing 2-handers usually have, the steps can't get too long. Similar timing principle to 1-handers where you want them walking passed the ball and creating some lag so the ball can swing freely and not be pulled down from the top. The skip step in the 4th step (for 5-step bowlers) has generally been tamed down by the pros so they are smoother in their footwork throughout for more control and accuracy.

Due to the lower back swing, they can get the ball started a little later timing wise, but they should still reach the timing spot, with the ball about shoulder height at the start of the slide. Kyle Troup is a little early here, but like Marshall Holman, he has a long slide and strong lower body to compensate.

I actually prefer to watch bowlers on video in real time.
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JJakobsen
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Joined: March 10th, 2013, 9:59 pm
Sport Average: 180
Positive Axis Point: 3 1/2 right, 1 1/2 up
Speed: 15.5 downlane
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Heavy Oil Ball: Storm Marvel Pearl
Medium Oil Ball: Brunswick Inferno
Light Oil Ball: Storm Timeless
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Re: Coaching 2 handers

Post by JJakobsen » September 30th, 2021, 10:33 am

deanchamp wrote:
September 30th, 2021, 1:22 am
Kyle Troup are Chris Via are 'P' types.

As for step lengths, due to the shorter back swing 2-handers usually have, the steps can't get too long. Similar timing principle to 1-handers where you want them walking passed the ball and creating some lag so the ball can swing freely and not be pulled down from the top. The skip step in the 4th step (for 5-step bowlers) has generally been tamed down by the pros so they are smoother in their footwork throughout for more control and accuracy.

Due to the lower back swing, they can get the ball started a little later timing wise, but they should still reach the timing spot, with the ball about shoulder height at the start of the slide. Kyle Troup is a little early here, but like Marshall Holman, he has a long slide and strong lower body to compensate.

I actually prefer to watch bowlers on video in real time.
Ah, so they have a more traditional approach than Belmo and Palermaa.

Should I let them feel where they should stand and use that data, as they all use 5 steps, no one fouls. Go by "if it works, it works". They all have a skip step, and are about one step later in timing at the start than myself and other one handers I've seen.
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Re: Coaching 2 handers

Post by deanchamp » September 30th, 2021, 11:00 pm

As per most bowlers, I like them to finish their slide close to the foul line so they don't get in the habit of lofting just to get the ball onto the lane.
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JJakobsen
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Posts: 282
Joined: March 10th, 2013, 9:59 pm
Sport Average: 180
Positive Axis Point: 3 1/2 right, 1 1/2 up
Speed: 15.5 downlane
Rev Rate: 450
Axis Tilt: 0
Axis Rotation: 30
Heavy Oil Ball: Storm Marvel Pearl
Medium Oil Ball: Brunswick Inferno
Light Oil Ball: Storm Timeless
Preferred Company: 900 Global
Location: Svolvær, Lofoten, Norway

Re: Coaching 2 handers

Post by JJakobsen » October 1st, 2021, 11:03 am

Yup, they do all get comfortably to the line. Only one who lofts is 2m tall so he's kinda excused, but I'll work with him to get him as low as he can comfortably
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